Editors and Advice Needed!

Happy Saturday!

This post is going to be jam-packed! I have been working very hard since yesterday's snow day on my newest product. I have been inspired by all the posts about Common Core Standards, and got the idea to make my own organization and teaching easier to manage. In an effort to make it easier to keep track of all the standards, I am creating Common Core Standards checklists for teachers. I have so far completed a K-2 Math Checklist packet, and am currently looking for editors! If you are interested in proof reading this product, please contact me via email at rachaelaschauer@gmail.com. I am looking for up to 3 editors for this product.Your help is much appreciated, and to show my appreciation, I will be sending you this product when it is all edited :)

On the same lines, I am interested in your take on this product. I have searched TeachersPayTeachers for similar products, as I want to see what I would likely charge for a product like this. I have racked my brain, trying to think of if I should charge for this product. Technically, none of the contents are my own...they belong to the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). I must admit, I struggle to understand Terms of Use for such websites as this, and am not sure what I am allowed, and not allowed to do. Do I have a right to charge for my creative process of making these standards more accessible to teachers by creating a more readable, user-friendly format? Or am I required to offer this for free? OR am I not allowed to offer it to anyone? Aye! I'm so confused...

Any insight into this matter is HIGHLY appreciated, as I would love to offer this to others, but would like to know if I am infringing upon anyone's rights by doing so. I suppose I should figure this out first, before I begin offering my product out for others to edit, huh?

In other, less confusing news...I have linked up with Fifth in the Middle's Blog By State Linky! I am a proud Massachusetts Blogger, and I have the badge to prove it

here:

and here --------------------------------------------------------->

I love finding other bloggers in my neck of the woods! Meet up some day perhaps?

I am also linking up with The Lower Elementary Cottage for her new Successful Saturday Linky! Check out the link for more information!


My success of the week: a make-shift, spontaneous addition lesson. I left my formal lesson plan write up with my materials in the teacher's resource room down the hall, and didn't have time to go grab it before my small group lesson started. My teaching assistant was out of the room, so she wasn't able to grab it for me, so while we waited, I decided to create a quick activity using the concept of dominoes for addition.
The students were asked to create dominoes creating an addition problem, and do it's reversal (or commutative property of addition) using stickers.
Here are the pictures for that mini-lesson addition review:
She is creating the Domino Number sentence 3 + 1 = 4 and 1 + 3 = 4

We are reiterating that the "order" of the addends does not matter in addition.
Final product!
This activity seemed especially successful, because the kiddos really really loved it! They kept asking to do it more, and didn't even want to transition to lunch, because they just didn't want to stop! Warmed my heart <3

I want to shout out a great post I read from What I Have Learned's blog. I have been trying to figure out how to incorporate more poetry instruction, while still meeting the other standards I need to focus on.  Well, this post nailed it! I needed this post! I am already thinking of ways to make my future poetry instruction similar to this. Check out the great post here.

I also would like to shout out a couple of great giveaways:

Ideas by Jivey is hosting a great 200 follower giveaway! Check it out and congratulate her :)

The Teacher Wife
Want to win some wonderful math resources? Head over to The Lamppost in First Grade Math for a set of Math Versatiles!

Until next time...

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14 comments

  1. I would be happy to help you edit if you need someone still:) I am a 1st/2nd grade teacher, and math is my favorite part of the day if that matters. In looking at TPT, as far as I can tell most people are charging. I am not an expert but from what I have read in seller newsletters, you may sell CCSS items in games and such so I am wondering (not sure and not a lawyer) if this would be the same as you are still giving them credit.
    Primary Classrooms are Oceans of Fun

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    1. Thanks so much for the offer! I have sent the document to you for your notes :)

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  2. Thanks for sharing my giveaway! :) I struggle with TOU on stuff like that too.... :( Sorry I can't help ya on that! I'd say just cite them like you would in a paper and go for the $! :)
    Jivey
    ideas by jivey


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    1. TOU is so loaded with jargon! Thanks anyways :)

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  3. I sent you an email! I'd be happy to edit for you as well if you still need someone! Just let me know!

    Christina :)
    Apples, Books, and Crayons
    applesbooksandcrayons@gmail.com

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    1. Great! I have replied to your email -- thanks for the offer!

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  4. Thank you so much for linking up to my new linky!

    I have K-2 common core checklists and when I was doing my research I read that you are free to use them. When I created mine I changed the wording to make them more easy for students/parents to understand to ensure I'm not just typing exactly the same thing.

    Lisa
    The Lower Elementary Cottage


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    1. Thank you for the advice - very helpful :)

      Great Linky by the way!

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  5. I love the idea of making a CCSS checklist! Are you just doing the K-2 standards? I am not 100% sure, but I think you would be able to sell them. They would be a great resource for teachers, especially if they were a little less wordy.. I know that I always have to read each standard like 10 times before I fully understand!

    Michaela

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    1. I am starting with K-2, but am going to do some for at least 3-5. I may do higher grades if there is a demand for them. Thanks for commenting :)

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  6. What a great idea for teaching Commutative Property! Stickers are always a winner with my class :) Its funny how sometimes the best ideas happen when we haven't really planned it!

    Thanks for sharing your lesson... I'm your latest follower :)

    Jess

    Early Years Fun

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  7. I just linked up too with Fifth in the Middle's State linky, and I noticed that you're in Massachusetts. Cool beans! My class is trying to collect postcards from all 50 states, and your state is one that we're missing. Is there any way you or someone in your class could (mail) share one with us? Let me know if you can. I'd be happy to return the favor for you!
    Michele
    The Lightbulb Lab

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  8. What a fun way to teach addition! I think I will use this with multiplication next year.

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Thanks for the comments! I look forward to reading them :)

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